Cyber Security Kiosks Defend against the Growing Threat of Malware

Olea OPSWAT Cyber Security Kiosks Infographic

 

Anti-malware Cyber Security Kiosks

Malware has experienced exponential proliferation since it was first discovered in 1984, when there were a mere 12 known instances of malware. In 2015, there were more than 400,000,000 malware instances with over 390,000 new instances of malicious programs discovered every day.

For corporations, it is more important than ever to use a multi-pronged approach to preventing malware and virus attacks on their network. By using an anti-malware security kiosk, corporations can significantly improve their cyber security and prevent unwanted invasions into their network.

Proliferation of Malware Since 2006

The rate at which Malware is proliferating has been increasing drastically over the past ten years, with the total number of malware instances expected to number more than 400 million by the end of 2015.  From 2012 through 2014, the total number of malware instances more than tripled.

387 New Malware Threats Every Minute in 2014

In 2014, there were over 50,000,000 new instances of malware. This amounted to over 387 new threats every minute or more than 6 every second!

Over 2 Million Ransomware Threats have been Detected

“Ransomware,” or malware attacks where information is held for ransom, have been on a rapid rise in the past two years. In Q4 of 2014, over 250,000 new instances of “ransomware” attacks were reported.

60% of Found USB Thumb Drives were Plugged In 

In 2011, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) planted computer discs, CDs and USB thumb drives in the parking lots around the DHS office to test the potential vulnerability posed by mobile media. The DHS found that 60% of people who picked up the devices plugged them in to a computer. Of those that found media planted with a DHS logo, 90% of the devices were plugged in to a computer.

Since 2012, two U.S. nuclear power plants have had viruses infiltrate their network through the use of USB thumb drives. Additionally, the highly publicized Stuxnet attack on the Iranian nuclear power plan in 2011 was also via a USB thumb drive.

The Olea OPSWAT security kiosks is an industry leading kiosk solution that provides all the features needed to maintain the highest levels of security in any building or facility: Olea’s California kiosk has a sleek design with a small footprint for ease of installation in any environment.

The California Security Kiosk is ADA, HIPAA and EMV compliant.

The Olea-OPSWAT security kiosk uses OPSWAT’s MetaScan software which implements a multi-malware scan system that incorporates the anti-malware engines of vendors like ESET, AVG, Microsoft, Bitdefender, Symantec, McAfee and more! The OPSWAT Metadefender software is built to run in an “Air Gapped” environment for the ultimate level of security. The Olea OPSWAT kiosk was deployed by one of the largest utility companies in the Western United States. The kiosks were used to scan CDs, USB flash drives, external hard disks, memory cards, PDAs and other portable media.  An average of over 1,000 devices were scanned each day with zero instances of malware infecting the network via scanned portable media.

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